About a year and a half ago, I wrote a blog entry about deaf computer science Ph.D.s. I recently revisited this topic and found out that I missed a few people from my earlier list, so this post is a continuation of my previous one. Here are the new Ph.D.s:

  1. Vinton Cerf (Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles, 1972) is hard-of-hearing, though he’s on the board of trustees at Gallaudet University.
  2. Daniel Berry (Ph.D., Brown University, 1974).
  3. Dimitri Kanevsky (Ph.D., Moscow State University, in the 1970s), though again, if we’re picky with our criteria, he actually got his Ph.D. in math.

These three people are all established scientists with impressive resumes, even if two of them don’t fit clearly in the mold of a “deaf” person.

Vinton Cerf is known as one of the “fathers of the Internet,” which should say a lot about his contributions to computer science. For instance, he helped to form the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), which manages the global domain naming system (its headquarters is in the U.S. … I’m not sure how other countries feel about that). Not surprisingly, Dr. Cerf has an array of awards and honors, including the Turing Award, the Presidential Medal of Freedom, and the National Medal of Technology. In 1997, he joined the board of trustees at Gallaudet University. Nowadays, he works at Google.

Daniel Berry has been deaf in both ears since birth, and can only use a hearing aid in one ear. He does not sign because his parents spoke English and he picked up lipreading, which may be one reason why I didn’t know of him until now (and he mentions on his website that he doesn’t have many hearing impaired acquaintances). In terms of academics, he got his computer science Ph.D. from Brown back in 1974. He then joined the faculty at UCLA from 1972 to 1987, The Israel Institute of Technology from 1987 to 1998, and then at the University of Waterloo from 1988 to now. Note that all three of these schools have outstanding computer science departments, which should give you an idea of his research ability. Professor Berry provides a brief paper on his website that describes his background in more detail, as well as his recommendations for making the web more accessible.

Dimitri Kanevsky got his Ph.D. in Russia in the 1970s (I can’t find the exact date) and held research positions at the Max Planck Institute in Germany and the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. Armed with mathematics background but a desire to make practical use of it, he joined IBM in 1986, where he still works today. Dr. Kanevsky specializes in speech recognition, so there’s a good chance that any recognition software today traces its origin to him. Dr. Kanevsky’s resume includes being named an IBM Master and more than 15o U.S. patents.

Unfortunately, I’ve never personally met any of these people, but it would be nice to do so someday.