Summers are nice because they offer me a break from an intense academic environment. As a result, I’ve had the chance to explore other fields that interest me, and one of them concerns the human diet. Simply put, I’m trying to figure out what I should eat in order to maintain a healthy life.

The Original Food Pyramid

There’s a lot of information available that we can use for diet advice. For instance, the United States Department of Agriculture has their famous (or infamous, as I’ll get to shortly) 1992 food pyramid:

food_pyramid

Let’s suppose we use this as a guide to optimal health, which seems reasonable because it’s from a United States government organization. (It shouldn’t be, because that pyramid has already been scrapped in favor of new dietary guidelines, but it’s good to discuss it to see the historical perspective on food.)

Unfortunately, even without consulting outside sources, I can already see several problems:

  1. It makes no distinction between whole or minimally processed foods and heavily processed foods. (I’ll throw in whole grains in the “minimally processed foods” category.) The former group includes fruits, vegetables, and animal products obtained from their natural state. The latter group would include pizza, chemically-laden meats, and so on.
  2. It suggests consuming fats, oils, and sweets sparingly, but the dairy and protein groups already include substantial amounts of fat. And my understanding is that fat has long been essential for human health. Our early ancestors ate lots of plants, but they would also eat the complete carcass of animals, including fat-dense organs that we shun today.
  3. It suggests that the serving counts should not be exceeded, which might impose unnecessary restrictions. Consider my situation: I love eating huge salads, and I also have a habit of downing an entire bag of baby carrots as an afternoon snack. This means that I easily rack up 7-10 servings of vegetables daily (depending on how you define a serving), but according to this pyramid, I shouldn’t be eating so many vegetables.

I know that no pyramid can disseminate detailed information in such a small amount of space, but such simple modifications could go a long way.

This brings me to the next part of this post.

Mark’s Daily Apple

My quest for learning more about health, diet, nutrition, and food led me to Mark’s Daily Apple. It’s an extensive blog written by Mark Sisson, a well-known advocate of eating the Paleo diet (though he calls it “Primal”) and preventing chronic diseases of civilization (e.g., diabetes and heart disease) by lifestyle choices. I didn’t think much of this at first, but the more I thought about the food I ate, the more I kept coming back to his blog. It also didn’t hurt that he’s another Williams alum, which might have piqued my curiosity.

Mark Sisson advocates his own food pyramid, which emphasizes meats (including fish, eggs, and fowl), vegetables, fats, fruits, and some carbohydrates. Notice the distinct lack of bread, rice, cereal, and pasta! It’s a long story about why he excludes them, but Sisson explains this in his blog and has some decent (but in my opinion, not overwhelming) evidence to back up his claims. For the most part, I favor his food pyramid over the 1992 USDA food pyramid, but I think Sisson’s pyramid should have kept vegetables as the “base” group to reiterate how they should compose the bulk of the diet in terms of volume.

If you want more information about his philosophy towards food and life, I’ll refer you to his Start Here page. When reading Mark’s Daily Apple, realize that Mark Sisson’s focus is not just on nutrition, but indeed, on a lifestyle. His advice encompasses sleep, play, exercise, and many other factors that affect our health. There’s so much out there that Mark Sisson posts new entries daily and still has no shortage of topics to talk about.

In a future blog post, I’ll delve more deeply into diet controversies. (Don’t worry — this digression doesn’t mean that I’m turning into a nutritionist…)